Milan Fashion Week Round-Up

BATD ON Mar 04, 2009 AT 6:33 pm

D&G

D&G

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce and Gabbana are in positively perfect form. In a world of disappearing budgets and cutbacks (with fashion being the first), our two favourite Italian designers pulled out all the stops. The D&G fall line named Elsa Shiaparelli as their go-to girl; her glamorous approach to tough times in 1940’s Italy, made her the ideal candidate. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana used Shiaparelli’s nonchalant attitude to shrug off economic distresses and produce a show full of luxe fabrics like fox, dyed goat hair and mink. It worked: the front row boasted top A-listers: Scarlett Johansson, Kate Hudson, Freida Pinto, and Eva Mendes flew in to view the collection.

Thirties and forties themes appeared in gloves used as headpieces, shell buttons and chunky suede wedges and puffed up sleeves with power shoulders stole the show. Narrow waisted silhouettes outlined in fur with wide, short skirts also prevailed. We did notice that makeup was minimalist and there was little jewellery on show. However hard times are, D&G will rise to the challenge with an even harder-to-beat line.

Prada

Prada

Prada
Miuccia Prada is one for shocking collections and haphazard chic austerity, but this fall, even we were blown away. It seems that every high-end designer tired of the sixties and seventies rage and instead opted for forties inspired coats and suits made from domestic fabrics. Even Prada found her collection a bit unexplainable. “I didn’t want to do anything about the city, more something about freedom and nature. But in the end, I realized I liked coats and suits. It was about a need for feminine empowerment.” In the world of Miuccia Prada, anything goes. Quirks worked their way into every outfit; triangular, fur-filled frocks paired with narrow, masculine leather belts and boots made us look twice, and then a third time, to the long runway.

Fringing on boots and velvet heels gave a trendier feel to severe tailoring. Of course, Prada inklings were fully evident. Bags (in plain leather or sequined) were staples on this catwalk, and unique embroidery managed to unify the whole collection. No matter how out of this world her designs appear, signature pieces will still keep Prada a little more down to earth each season. (And we can’t wait for next.) The models, all with extreme teased hair and white faces lit up with red glittering eyes, certainly gave a spiteful, but not necessarily commanding, feel to the collection. Body hugging frocks made of tweed and stiff leather used slits to reveal glimpses of bare leg and red knit underwear. (At least their pants had some colour!)

Versace

Versace

Versace
Donatella Versace is in love with the eighties but isn’t looking back to it, like every other retrospective designer this season. (Luckily, we feel the same!) Her collection was jam packed instead with slinky dresses in metallics like silver, gunmetal grey and midnight blue. All bling and bangles aside, detailed trenches and silk pencil skirts swished down the runway on leggy models, while super skinny cargos and biker jackets together pushed the fashion label just far enough. Gone was the gold we’ve come to expect, and dress after goddess-like dress captivated even Anna Wintour’s critical gaze. Show stoppers were the red gauzy dress, and an intricate beaded gown. The music and models seemed to drag on a bit at the end, but it gave us time to notice models like Carmen Kass, Coco Rocha, and Isabeli Fontana, who filled out the dresses with obvious but understated poise. We’re still applauding Donatella Versace for showing us that some creations can improve with age. With such an incredible line and a knack for originality in the face of economic despair, she’s truly a breath of fresh air.

Marni

Marni
Marni

This fall, Consuelo Castiglioni’s dark layering of textures exuded casual elegance. The look she achieved isn’t an easy feat, especially with inspirations drawing from psychedelic artists like DaDa. Mink earmuffs and trapper hats, fur mitts and ski gloves at first made us feel like the collection belonged on top of a ski lift, but soon the wintry mood lifted. Gold flowers, wool patterned leggings, and stacks of bangles made accessories one of the highlights of the knit and fur combinations. We also spotted metallic brocades, plain felts, in addition to patchworks with forest green and creamy rose.

This designer’s dabblings in colour palettes and widely contrasting proportions were a few long strides away from the loose-lined assembles she often produces. Think sporty, with squared-off boxy coats and sharp tunic dresses, even jogging pants and parkas. One tweed coat with a fur back panel came with a protective removable lining. With years of outstanding, extravagant designs under her belt, Marni collections have put its designers on a high pedestal. In this case, it’s more of their footstool; this season ranks as one of the most inspiring collections, and the first to balance creative and realistic with whimsical. The front row fashion pack included the likes of British Vogue’s Alexandra Shulman, Lucinda Chambers, and The Telegraph’s ever-critical Hilary Alexander who flashed smiles of adoration as the ending parade began. As imaginative as this collection appears, you don’t have to be a supermodel to look fabulous Marni’s pieces . That’s what we call effortless chic.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Comments are closed.